Mark Driscoll: A Theology of Hate and the God of Love Reviewed by Momizat on . Influential pastor Mark Driscoll claims that God might hate you. Does that describe the God revealed through Jesus? Adam claims that Driscoll's god is closer to Influential pastor Mark Driscoll claims that God might hate you. Does that describe the God revealed through Jesus? Adam claims that Driscoll's god is closer to Rating:
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Mark Driscoll: A Theology of Hate and the God of Love

Influential pastor Mark Driscoll claims that God might hate you. Does that describe the God revealed through Jesus? Adam claims that Driscoll’s god is closer to the gods of Rome than the God of Jesus. Janus was a Roman god who had conflicting wills of love and hate. There is no conflicting will in the God revealed through Jesus, who loves all people. Jesus explicitly says that God loves even God’s enemies. There is no room for hate within God. Nor is there room for hate for those who claim to follow Jesus. Rather, in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7) Jesus challenges his followers to be perfect like God by loving all people, including those we call our enemies.

If you are interested in reading more about the word study on wrath, love, and anger in the Bible, see Zach Hunts article at “American Jesus” here.

Driscoll’s sermon “Jesus Sweats Blood” can be read and listened to here.

Comments (5)

  • Andrew McKenna

    Thanks for the SNL link and Henderson’ decisive comment on it. The famously two-faced Janus reference is indispensable, for that seems very often to be the god that self-described Christians worship: a friendly face to me and mine, a hostile one to those whom I do not like. For the Romans to keep the friendly face toward them, they had to sacrifice to Janus–their enemies.

    Reply
    • Stephen

      Hey Andrew
      The difference is, the Romans god was a created god , and the True Christian God is the Creator God . the Holy Bible is from our Creator , there is enough evidence and credibility in the Holy Bible which proofs this truth. A person doing their dugelance would see this to be true ,but the majority of people prefer to make up their own god , and make it sound compaiable to True Christianity

      Reply
      • Adam Ericksen

        Hi Stephen,
        I’m not quite sure what you are trying to say here, but no one can accuse Andrew of not doing his due diligence. The Bible is true in that it shows God hears the cry of the victims, the oppressed. But not only does God hear the cry, God in Jesus becomes a victim who cries out. Jesus cries out not for revenge, but for forgiveness. As Andrew says, the God seen through Jesus is not a Roman Janus faced god, giving a friendly face to me and a hostile face to my enemies. No, this God confronts us all with vulnerability, love and forgiveness and asks us to follow. That’s not a God I want. I want a God who is for me and against my enemies. I can control that God. But this God love all and bid us to do the same.
        Peace,
        Adam

        Reply
  • Regan Clem

    I just wanted to say that I thought this was excellent. I really liked the part where you show that Jesus elevated one attribute of God over the others. I was hoping to find some of Driscoll’s teachings of violence, but stumbling on this was refreshing.

    Reply

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