Home » Blogs

Iraq and Endless War

Our kills are clean and secular; theirs are messy and religious. “In their effort to create a caliphate across parts of Iraq and Syria,” CNN tells us, “ISIS fighters have slaughtered civilians as they take over cities in both countries. “In Syria, the group put some of its victims’ severed heads on poles.” Stomach-churning as this is, the context in which it is reported – as simplistic maneuvering of public ...

Read more

Robin Williams on the Ultimate Christian Gift

I hesitated to write about the tragic death of Robin Williams. I know very little about clinical depression, so I fear saying something stupid or ignorant about it – and please forgive me if I do. The better part of wisdom is to stop blogging and learn from the experts about depression. And I’d like to begin with a disclaimer: I’m interpreting what Robin Williams said about God. But please, don’t misunderst ...

Read more

Sharing Space with God: A Possible Return to Eden

Was the Garden of Eden a shared space? The answer seems obvious – yes, God created the garden and then shared it with Adam and then Eve. But there’s that little problem of the tree that God didn’t want to share. “You may freely eat of every tree of the garden,” God told his newly created companions. “But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you s ...

Read more

Hatred In The Nuclear Era

Before nuclear weapons, after nuclear weapons . . . “The latter era, of course,” writes Noam Chomsky, “opened on August 6, 1945, the first day of the countdown to what may be the inglorious end of this strange species, which attained the intelligence to discover the effective means to destroy itself, but — so the evidence suggests — not the moral and intellectual capacity to control its worst instincts.” We ...

Read more

Book Feature Friday: Pascale’s Wager by Anthony Bartlett

"I cannot know what darkness is, because it’s just darkness, but love can know it, and love always goes on regardless. Love is searching for endless love and it searches all the way around the empty universe until it meets itself coming back."  -- Pascale's Wager Some days I am tempted to despair. As I write, massacres are taking place in various corners of the world, global warming is rapidly encroaching u ...

Read more

A Defense of the Passive Voice

Would you rather be a noun or an adjective? That was the question a friend asked herself when she decided to be known as Nance instead of Nancy. “Why be an adjective,” she quipped, “when you can be a noun?” I laughed out loud! But hey, I am a writer and literature nerd, so thinking of myself as a part of speech tickled my funny bone. My immediate reaction was to agree with her – a noun is surely much grande ...

Read more

The Water of Life

I’m thirsty. Indeed, I’m overwhelmed by thirst, thinking about those who lack access to clean water. I’m thirsty for a different world. “In Gaza, hundreds of thousands of Palestinians lack water, including those living in hospitals and refugee camps,” Sarah Kendzior wrote in Al-Jazeera last week. “On July 15, citizens of Detroit held a rally in solidarity, holding signs that said ‘Water for all, from Detroi ...

Read more

Book Feature Friday: Interview with Author Brian McLaren on “We Make the Road By Walking”

Suzanne and Adam interview Brian McLaren about his latest book We Make the Road by Walking. Brian discusses the events of Holy Week, including: Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter. How should we interpret the violence in the Bible? What does sacrifice mean? Is it good to doubt and fall into despair? What does Resurrection mean to the modern world? Those are just a few questions we explore in this engagin ...

Read more

Disability Is Not Just a Metaphor by Christopher Shinn

Christopher Shinn is an American playwright. Born in Hartford, Connecticut in 1975, Shinn lives in New York and teaches playwriting in The New School for Drama. A 2005 winner of an OBIE in Playwriting and a Guggenheim Fellowship in Playwriting plus a 2008 Pulitzer Prize finalist, the plays he has written have been produced around the world. Mimetic theory and personal experience guides his writing, as this ...

Read more

Brian McLaren, World War I and the New (Old) Heroism

On July 29, 1914 the first shots of the Great War were fired from gunboats on the Danube River. Austro-Hungarian artillery shelled Serbia from the river and the war that was supposed to be over in weeks or months lasted four and a half years, nearly wiping out a generation of young men from across Europe. Wikipedia’s WWI entry reports that “The total number of military and civilian casualties in World War I ...

Read more

© 2011 Raven Foundation. Site by JPMM.

Scroll to top