Democracy, Violence and the Risk of Tyranny: An Interview with Prof. Paul Dumouchel

This Wednesday, October 12, at 7:00pm Central Time, Suzanne Ross will interview Dr. Paul Dumouchel on violence, tyrrany, and terrorism in the context of the 2016 election. "The global world is a world of global violence," Prof. Dumouchel warns, and we would be served well by recognizing the new challenges that face those working for peace and justice. Don't miss this pivotal conversation!

A Message to White America About How to Decide If You’ll See “The Birth of A Nation”

Whether or not "Birth of a Nation" actor and writer Nate Parker is guilty of rape or any crime or moral failing, he may still be scapegoated, Suzanne Ross explains. "If white America so easily condemns Parker for refusing to acknowledge his crime, yet we continue to deny the ongoing legacy of racism and its effect on African-Americans, then it may be that we are guilty of the very thing we accuse Parker – perpetrating violence and denying our guilt."

Stop the Killing

As war rages on in Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, and the United States, even after mistakenly bombing Syrian soldiers, continues to justify its militarism in the name of peace, Robert Koehler echoes the simple but profound advice of President Jimmy Carter: "Stop the killing."

Daniel, God, and Apocalyptic Nonviolence: Bible Matters

Adam Ericksen continues his exploration of the Bible with the apocalyptic book of Daniel. Daniel reveals the truth about human relationships, specifically the truth about human violence. Can this apocalyptic book lead us to peace? Or are we doomed to a future of violence? Explore this fascinating book with Adam in his installment of the Bible Matters series.

Reading the Classics in Prison with Andrew McKenna

"Mimetic theory is a no brainer," states a student of Andrew McKenna, in an essay written within the confines of prison. The anthropological truth of mimetic theory, exposed in Scripture and expressed in literature, is deeply understood by prisoners. Suzanne Ross introduces us to Professor Andrew McKenna and his compassionate outreach to prisoners through his teaching of African American classics as they "unveil the sacrificial dynamics that propel myriad forms of racial oppression.”